GPA Information

Calculating your GPA

To calculate your GPA, you need two numbers: your Quality Points and your GPA credits earned.

If you are a GCU student, you can easily get these two numbers from your online transcript.  Just look for them on the last line of the transcript on the line marked "Cumulative" or "Cum".  To calculate your GPA from these two numbers, you simply divide the total Quality Points by the total GPA Credits.

GPA =

Quality Points

----------------

GPA Credits

However, if you are not a GCU student, you can manually calculate your GPA.

If you are not a GCU student, or want to calculate your GPA manually, here are the steps to do so:

  1. For each grade value, total the number of credits you received that grade for (for example, receiving an A in 14 credits, a B+ in 12 credits, and a C in 3 credits for all courses that will apply towards your GPA.  Transferred courses and certain courses(Skills Development for example) at GCU do not apply towards GPA calculation.
  2. Multiply each total of credits by the appropriate Quality Point Multiplier (the Georgian Court scale can be found by clicking here)
  3. Total all the multiplied answers and you will now have your Quality Points.
  4. Total all the credits used to make the above calculation to get your GPA Credits
  5. Divide the Quality Points by the GPA credits derived above and you have your GPA.

There are two types of GPAs: cumulative and major.  Your cumulative GPA includes every course that applies towards your total GPA.  Your major GPA includes only those courses that apply towards your major.  You calculate both GPAs using the same calculation, but you use different sets of courses in the calculation.

Repeats and your GPA

When you repeat a course and get a higher grade, the new grade takes the place of the old grade, but the credits only count once. It will be as if you never got the grade in the first attempt, and are now earning this higher grade.

Effect of New Credits on GPA

Every course that you take that applies towards your GPA affects the GPA in some fashion.  As you can see from the calculations above, the less credits you have, the more of an impact a new grade will have on your GPA.  Look at the following examples below.

Example 1

Student A has a 3.5 GPA after finishing 16 GPA credits.  The next semester, this student only takes 1 course for 3 credits and gets an F in the course.  This grade lowers the student's cumulative GPA to 2.947.

Example 2

Student B has a 3.5 GPA after finishing 76 GPA credits.  The next semester, this student only takes 1 course for 3 credits and gets an F in the course.  This grade lowers the student's cumulative GPA to 3.36.

As you can see from the above examples, the number of total GPA credits can greatly impact the effect one course (or semester) has on your GPA.  Student A and B both performed the same in the one semester, but since Student B had finished more credits than Student A, the one F dropped Student B's GPA much less than Student A's.  This is the same for students trying to raise their GPA with a single course.  The more credits you have already completed, the less impact an individual grade/semester has on the cumulative GPA.

How to Calculate a GPA needed to Raise you Cum GPA

If you want to calculate what you need to do to raise your GPA to a certain level, it is a relatively simple calculation.  However, you need to know three numbers : your current GPA, your desired GPA, and the total number of credits you currently have.

The All-4.0 Method

You can use the following calculation to determine how many credits you need to get straight A's in to raise your GPA to a certain level.  The formula is listed below:

Credits of straight A's needed =

Current GPA Credits X (Desired GPA - Current GPA)

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4.0 - Desired GPA

For example, Jane Smith currently has a 3.5 after 50 GPA credits of coursework.  Jane would like to have a 3.75 cumulative GPA.  Using the above formula, we would make the calculations as follows: 

Credits of straight A's needed =

50 X (3.75 - 3.5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
4.0 - 3.75

This calculation tells us that Jane would need an additional 50 credits of straight A's to raise her GPA to a 3.75.

The Any Credit Level Method

You can also use the above formula to determine how many credits you need to get a particular GPA in to raise your GPA to a certain level.  All you do is substitute the future GPA for the 4.0.  The future GPA is the GPA you expect to get in courses not yet taken and does not include any coursework you have already completed.

Credits needed =

Current GPA Credits X (Desired GPA - Current GPA)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Future GPA - Desired GPA
 

For example, Jane Smith has a 2.5 after 50 GPA credits of coursework.  Jane would like to have a 3.0 cumulative GPA.  However, for whatever reason, Jane doesn't think she can get any higher than a 3.5 GPA in her future courses.  Using the above formula:

Credits needed =

50 X (3.0 - 2.5)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
3.5 - 3.0

So, according to this calculation, Jane would need to take 50 credits and get a 3.5 in the next 50 credits in order to raise her GPA to a 3.0

 

 

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