DThe Georgian Court-Meridian Health School of Nursing

Nursing Course Descriptions

Introduction to Professional Nursing - NU111   
This course presents a basic introduction to professional nursing practice and is a prerequisite for all other nursing courses. The course presents a broad overview of the non-clinical aspects of the nursing experience such as the philosophy of the nursing program, the history of nursing, settings in which nursing is practiced, nursing and healthcare regulatory agencies, nursing classification systems, career options within the nursing profession, and technology as it relates to nursing. The course also introduces participants to the steps in the nursing process and the basic processes (evidence-based practice, quality assurance, and performance improvement) inherent in knowledge translation into practice, including evidence-based practice.  Prerequisite:  admission into the B.S.N. program as a nursing major, or permission of the department chairperson.  2 hours lecture, one semester; 2 credits.

Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice - NU211
In this course, the student will examine nursing and other pertinent theories and conceptual frameworks, and the relationship between theory and practice will be explored. The student will have the opportunity to consider legal, ethical, cultural, political, and economic influences that impact professional nursing practice.  Professional regulations and practice standards will be identified and discussed.  An overview of evidence-based, patient- and family-centered care and the nursing competencies needed to practice safely and effectively are reviewed. Students are introduced to the nursing process as it relates to evidence-based decision-making in health and illness as well as concepts in therapeutic, intra-and interdisciplinary communication.  Prerequisites: Nursing major status; BI213,214; NU111.   3 hours lecture, one semester; 3 credits. 

Introduction to Patient Care across the Lifespan - NU221
In this course, the student is introduced to the fundamental knowledge and clinical skills needed to practice as a professional nurse. Adult and child health history, assessment, and physical examination are presented and demonstrated. The learner is guided in differentiating between wellness and illness through conducting thorough and systematic physical, psychosocial, and cultural assessments of individuals across the lifespan. Application of the nursing process in beginning clinical practice will be highlighted. Skills relative to the practice of nursing are practiced in the clinical laboratory through simulated experiences and in selected settings. Students will perform health histories, practice basic assessment skills and therapeutic communication techniques, and perform review of systems in the simulation laboratory.  Prerequisites: Nursing major status; BI213,214, NU111.  2 hours lecture, 6 hours clinical, one semester; 4 credits. 

Nutrition in Health and Illness - NU265
In this course, the learner will explore the science of nutrition and diet therapy as they apply to health and illness needs of individuals and groups across the lifespan.  The central role of nursing in promoting good nutritional habits and health will be discussed, and the importance of collaboration with the interdisciplinary team will be highlighted. The role of the essential nutrients in maintaining health and preventing disease will be studied. Diet modifications and holistic health concepts will be examined and evaluated. Students learn to apply the nursing process to integrate nutrition into nursing care.  Prerequisites:  BI213, CH151, NU111.  2 hours lecture, one semester; 2 credits.

Evidence-Based Nursing Care of the Adult - NU271 
This course prepares the learner to use the nursing process to plan, implement, and evaluate effective, collaborative, and culturally appropriate evidence-based plans of care that meet the bio/psycho/social needs for adult patients. The course builds on previous foundations of nursing practice with a focus on integrating pathophysiologic and pharmacologic concepts with the principles of the nursing process, health promotion, risk reduction, clinical decision-making, and collaborative management of care for adults experiencing mild to moderate health alterations. Theoretical foundations are reinforced as the nursing process is applied to adult patients within the context of evidence-based, patient- and family- centered care. The clinical experience focuses on the application of pathophysiologic and pharmacologic knowledge within the context of professional nursing practice in the nursing care of adult patients.  As such, the clinical experience is based in settings that allow focus on the application of the clinical reasoning process, nursing diagnoses, patient outcomes, and nursing interventions in the care of patients across the adult lifespan and continuum of care. The clinical sites also support students' developing responsibility for collaboration with other members of the interdisciplinary team.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214, CH151, NU111,211,221.  3 hours lecture, 9 hours clinical, one semester; 6 credits.

The following series of four pharmacology courses, taken concurrently with clinical courses, are designed to enhance the knowledge and skills necessary for the student learner to safely and effectively administer and evaluate pharmacological therapies in patients. The course will supplement the drug-specific information that is threaded through each of the clinical courses and will emphasize basic and advanced principles of pharmacotherapy as it relates to patient care across the lifespan.  Students will learn to use the nursing process in medication administration. Case studies and clinical simulations will be heavily utilized to promote patient safety as it relates to drug therapy.

Pharmacotherapeutics I (NU280)
Prerequisites:  BI213,214, CH151, NU111,211,221.  Corequisite: NU271. 1 hour lecture, one semester; 1 credit.

Pharmacotherapeutics II
 (NU330)
Prerequisites: BI213,214,319, NU111,211,221,265,271,280.   Corequisite: NU321. 1 hour lecture, one semester; 1 credit.

Pharmacotherapeutics III (NU380) 
Prerequisites: BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,265,271,280,321,330.  Corequisite: NU371.  1 hour lecture, one semester; 1 credit. 

Pharmacotherapeutics IV (NU430)  
Corequisites:  NU421,425.  1 hour lecture, one semester; 1 credit.  
 
Evidence-Based Nursing Care of Childbearing and Childrearing Families - NU321
This course prepares the learner to provide family-centered, evidence-based nursing care using concepts associated with the unique responses of families during the childbearing and childrearing cycle, including normal and high-risk pregnancies and the unique responses of neonates, children, adolescents, and their families to acute and chronic illness. Students will learn to integrate family, cultural, and developmental theories into evidence-based nursing practice with childbearing and childrearing families in a variety of settings. Students will learn to provide effective, collaborative, and culturally appropriate family-centered care while they continue to develop in their roles of clinical practitioner, patient educator, and patient advocate while focusing on health promotion, risk reduction, and illness and disease management in contemporary society. The clinical experience focuses on the application of family and developmental theory to the diagnosis, intervention, and outcomes management in the care of childbearing and childrearing families. As such, the clinical experience is based in a variety of settings, allowing focus on the application of the clinical reasoning process, including formulation of nursing diagnoses, delivery of nursing interventions, and evaluation of patient outcomes in the care of childbearing and childrearing families across the continuum of health. The clinical sites also support students' developing responsibility for collaboration with other members of the interdisciplinary team.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319,  NU111,211,221,265,271,280.  3 hours lecture, 15 hours clinical, one semester; 8 credits. 

Evidence for Professional Nursing Practice - NU343
This course presents in-depth exploration of material that was introduced in NU111 Introduction to Professional Nursing and NU211 Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice related to knowledge translation into practice, particularly the processes and relationships among research, evidence-based practice, quality assurance, and performance improvement. Using the ACE Star model as a foundation, the course presents the knowledge translation process and offers the learner guided experience in such key knowledge translation activities as formulating PICO questions, performing literature searches, evaluating research studies and systematic reviews, and assessing clinical guidelines for applicability in clinical nursing practice.  Prerequisites:  NU111,211,221,265,271,280.  3 hours lecture, one semester; 3 credits. 

Issues in Evidence-Based Nursing Care of the Older Adult - NU355
This course gives further foundation to students to provide patient-centered, evidenced-based nursing care using concepts related to the unique physiological, developmental, and psychosocial aspects of the older adult. Students will have the opportunity to consider fundamental aging and developmental theories, normal changes of aging and health deviations, and cultural influences for their impact on delivering evidence-based nursing practice to older adults. Students will also discuss appropriate strategies for providing effective, collaborative, and culturally appropriate patient-centered care that focus on health promotion, risk reduction, and illness and disease management. The course provides the opportunity for observations and field experiences based in a variety of older adult settings, allowing students to observe clinical reasoning processes, nursing diagnoses, patient outcomes, and nursing interventions in the care of older adults across the continuum of health and within multidisciplinary settings.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,271,280,321,330.  2 hours lecture, one semester; 2 credits. 

Evidence-Based Nursing Care of the Adult II - NU371 
This course continues preparation of the learner to use the nursing process to plan, implement, and evaluate effective, collaborative, and culturally appropriate evidence-based plans of care that meet the bio/psycho/social needs for adult patients with multi-system dysfunctions. The course builds on previous foundations of nursing practice of the adult patient and continues the focus of integrating pathophysiologic and pharmacologic concepts with the principles of nursing process, health promotion, risk reduction, clinical decision-making, and collaborative management of care for adults experiencing acute and chronic multi-system dysfunctions across the continuum of care. Theoretical foundations are reinforced as the nursing process is applied to adult patients within the context of evidence-based, patient- and family-centered care. The clinical experience allows the learner the opportunity to apply pathophysiologic and pharmacologic principles within the context of professional nursing practice in the nursing care of adult patients with emergent and/or major alterations in health. As such, the clinical experience is based in settings that allow focus on the application of the clinical reasoning process, nursing diagnoses, patient outcomes, and nursing interventions in the care of patients across the adult lifespan with multi-system dysfunctions. The clinical sites also support students' developing responsibility for collaboration with other members of the interdisciplinary team.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,265,271,280,321,330.  3 hours lecture, 15 hours clinical, one semester; 8 credits. 

Evidence-Based Nursing Practice in the Community - NU421
This course prepares the learner to apply principles of evidence-based care to promote and preserve health and prevent illness in families, groups, and populations in the community setting in the face of changing social, economic, political, and environmental realities.  The course will allow students to integrate concepts and theories from epidemiology and public health nursing as well as knowledge gained from previous learning as applied to the health of populations and communities.  The learner also will evaluate the influence of cultural diversity, economics, health policy, and ethics as they impact community health nursing practice. Concepts and principles of disaster planning are incorporated so that the student can gain a broad perspective on the nurse’s role in supporting emergency preparedness and response. The clinical component focuses on the assessment of the health care needs of the community as client, and on the planning and implementation of strategies to promote and maintain health and wellness for communities and populations in a variety of settings.  The learner will conduct an in-depth community assessment employing basic epidemiological principles and data collection strategies and will utilize the nursing process to plan and implement strategies for health promotion and disease prevention.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,271,280,321,330,355,371,380.  3 hours lecture, 9 hours clinical, one semester; 6 credits. 

Evidence-Based Behavioral Health - NU425
This course prepares the learner to integrate previous knowledge from the biophysical and psychosocial sciences, theories of human development and personality, and theories of human behavior with the art of the purposeful use of self to provide evidence-based nursing care to patients with behavioral health issues and their families in a variety of settings.  Students will learn to provide effective, collaborative, and culturally appropriate psychiatric nursing care as they continue to develop in their roles of clinical practitioner, patient educator, and patient advocate, with a specific focus on health promotion, risk reduction, and the nursing management of psychiatric illness in contemporary society. The clinical experience focuses on the application of communication, developmental, and behavioral theory to the nursing diagnoses, intervention, and outcomes management in the care of psychiatric patients. To support these clinical foci, clinical experience is based in a variety of settings, including community-based self-help groups, providing learning opportunities in the application of clinical reasoning processes in the care of the patient with behavioral health needs across the continuum. The clinical sites also support students' developing responsibility for collaboration with other members of the interdisciplinary team.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,271,280,321,330,355,371,380.  3 hours lecture, 9 hours clinical, one semester; 6 credits. 

Evidence-Based Leadership and Management in Nursing - NU471
This course gives students the foundation upon which to build their professional leadership skills. The course focuses on management principles, leadership concepts and theories, executive decision-making processes, and use of financial concepts and principles. Principles related to public policy development and health care economics also are explored. Students utilize critical thinking skills to analyze contemporary global, national, and local trends in nursing and health care and begin to develop the skills necessary to thrive in a turbulent health care environment. Students are given the opportunity to examine management principles as they relate to roles inherent in nursing management and administration positions through a capstone change project paper and presentation. This course gives students the opportunity to explore various leadership roles and styles through both observational and participatory experiences.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,271,280,321,330,355,371,380.  2 hours lecture, 3 hours clinical, one semester; 3 credits. 

Transition into Professional Nursing Practice - NU496
This course culminates the generic nursing curriculum and provides students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge from all previous courses in humanities, social and natural sciences, and nursing to provide evidence-based, patient- and family-centered nursing care to patients with complex health care issues across the adult lifespan. The didactic portion of this course will be devoted to group work in which reflective practice through writing is introduced and exercised, culminating in a capstone presentation of a reflective practice scenario. As a final transition into professional nursing practice, the clinical component of this course allows students the opportunity to choose their practicum from a variety of adult acute care settings and to practice under realistic shift and patient-load conditions with the guidance of registered professional nurse preceptors. Focus will be on the delivery of effective, collaborative, and culturally appropriate patient- and family-centered nursing care to several patients who require complex health care. Emphasis also will be on exhibition of delegation skills; high-level priority-setting; and planning for continuum of care, including discharge planning and interdisciplinary referral. This intensive eight-week course also includes opportunities for students to conduct reflective practice through guided group discussion sessions. This course is taken in sequence during the semester with the seven-week Evidence-Based Leadership and Management in Nursing course.  Prerequisites:  BI213,214,319, CH151, NU111,211,221,271,280,321,330,355,371,380.  1 hour lecture, 12 hours clinical, one semester; 5 credits. 

Nursing Electives
At least two credits of nursing elective courses are required and will be taken in the senior year. Courses to satisfy this requirement are being developed.


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